Butcher’s Broom Magical Uses

The ancient Greeks already knew about butcher’s broom magical uses. This plant’s true leaves are imperceptible scales that grow along the stem. What seems to be the leaves are indeed pseudoleaves, botanically known as phylloclades. From them, flowers and fruits grow.

Butcher's broom plant with fruit and leaves

Butcher’s Broom Scientific Facts

  1. Scientific Name – Ruscus aculeatus L.
  2. Other Names – Kneeholly.
  3. French – Fragon.
  4. Spanish – Rusco.
  5. Environment – Limy soils and forests, mainly beech and holm oak forests, in Central and South Europe.
  6. Description – Evergreen shrub of the Liliaceae family, with an upright stem growing from 1 to 1 and a half meters high. Its fruit is a red berry.
  7. Parts of the plant used medicinally: The rhizome and the root.

Butcher’s Broom Magical Uses

The root and the rhizome of the butcher’s broom contain steroid saponins with anti-inflammatory and vasoconstrictive actions and rhutine as a protective measure for the capillary vessels (vitamin P effect). Butcher’s broom is probably the vegetal remedy with the most potent venotonic action. Thus, it is part of many anti-hemorrhoid and anti-varicose medicines. Its uses are the following ones:

the legs of a woman stretched out in a tub filled with water
Lotions with a decoction of butcher’s broom root help to fight cellulitis.

How to use Butcher’s Broom

  1. Decoction with 40 to 60 grams of root or rhizome per liter of water, boiling for ten minutes. Drink from 4 to 6 cups daily.
  2. Lotions with the same decoction employed for internal use.

REFERENCES

George D. Pamplona-Roger, M.D. “Encyclopedia of Medicinal Plants.” George D. Pamplona-Roger, M.D. Encyclopedia of Medicinal Plants. Ed. Francesc X. Gelabert. Vols. 1 San Fernando de Henares: Editorial Safeliz, 2000. 259. Print.

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